Author: Abhishek Singh

Slogans on National Flag of India

National flag of India is rectangular in shape and has three horizontal stripes of saffron, white and green from top to bottom respectively. The white stripe in middle has a 24 spokes Ashoka Chakra in navy blue at its centre. The National flag was adopted by the constituent Assembly on 22nd July 1947 and officially became the Flag of the Dominion of India on 15th August 1947 and the Republic of India after 26th January 1950. It is also called Tiranga (in Hindi) or Tricolor, which means having three colors. The design of the Indian National Flag was hugely inspired from a flag designed by freedom fighter Pingali Venkayya for Indian National Congress in 1921. The National Flag is made of Khadi and has a length to breadth ratio of 3:2. The saffron color of the flag represents strength and courage, white represents peace and tranquility and green represents prosperity and fertility. The Ashoka Chakra depicts Dharma chakra and is taken from edicts of Ashoka. The Bureau of Indian Standards decides on the manufacturing and specifications of the flag, while its display is governed by the Flag code of India. The Flag Code of India has been amended twice, first in 2002 to allow the flag’s display by general public and again in 2005 to use it in certain specific form of clothing. Slogans on National Flag in English...

Read More

Slogans on Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar

Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar also known as B.R. Ambedkar was born on 14th April 1891 in Mhow (now Dr. Ambedkar Nagar) in Madhya Pradesh. Dr. Ambedkar was an economist and a social reformer, who dedicated his life for the uplift of Indian untouchable (dalit) community. Himself belonging to a backward class, he had faced the discrimination from a very early age and felt the pains of it. He was the first untouchable to enter the prestigious Elphinstone College, Mumbai. The practice of untouchability was so deeply rooted during those times that his colleagues at Sydenham College of Commerce And Economics in Mumbai refused to share same water jug with him, when he was working as a professor there. Such incidents only made him more resolved to fight the class discrimination which was prevalent in Hindu religion. He achieved one of the major milestones in his fight against untouchability when he successfully converted to Buddhism on 14th October 1956 along with half a million other dalits at Deekshabhoomi in Nagpur Maharashtra. He is credited of bringing many social and political reforms by organizing the untouchables throughout India. He fought against the discrimination as well as for the political and social rights of the untouchable community. He was also the Chairman of the Constitution Drafting Committee, when India gained Independence and is known as the ‘Father of The Constitution of India’. The...

Read More

Slogans on AIDS and World AIDS Day

AIDS stands for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; as the name suggests, the disease targets the immune system of the infected.  The disease is caused by the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) Virus. HIV Virus can transmit among humans through unprotected sex, hypodermic needle sharing or reuse or through saliva. The initial symptoms of the infection are like any other normal flu or viral infection, involving fever, cold, cough etc. In some cases the infection might not reveal itself at all until in later stages. Its initial symptoms are mistaken for common infections and treated thus, but in its later stages the infection causes unusual ailments like tuberculosis, and other pathogenic infections which would otherwise not affect an individual with healthy immune system. The traditional treatments don’t improve the condition of the infected, because the HIV infection considerably reduces the immunity of the affected body. The infection needs to be established by a clinical test for the presence of virus, in the blood of the infected. The disease is not curable but under correct medical treatment and guidance the infected could live longer than what he would in normal conditions. Some high income countries have normal life expectancy of the infected because of best medical care, facilities and medicines. Since the beginning of the infection more than 35 Millions have died and over 36.7 Million people are still infected with the...

Read More

Importance of Education for Adults

Introduction Adult Education is a practice in which the adults of a community are engaged in learning activities to develop new skills, knowledge or even personality. It is a platform where adults could use years of experience and knowledge to learn new skills for a better future. Adult education might also include classes for those adults who never had a chance to go to school but are eager to learn for dignity and growth. Adult Education also includes certifications for the acquired skills; opening better job prospects and providing a chance for social and financial development of an individual. Adult Education has no restrictions of gender or age and men women as young as in their 20s and as old as in their 60s have enrolled for adult education; for the absolute pleasure of learning and progress. How Literate are our Adults? Today, globally more than 207 Million students are enrolled in graduation programs in various disciplines, but on the flip side we still have 750 Million illiterate adults who never had access to a classroom. Women on the other hand constitute to 68% of the total illiterate adults. One in every five adults (20%) has never been to a school and is unable to read or write. Asia pacific (22%), North Africa (41%) and sub- Saharan Africa (41%) are still reeling under adult illiteracy. Thirty countries have adult...

Read More

Importance of Education for Women

Article on Importance of Education for Women Introduction Women education is a catch all term which refers to the state of primary, secondary, tertiary and health education in girls and women. There are 65 Million girls out of school across the globe; majority of them are in the developing and underdeveloped countries. All the countries of the world, especially the developing and underdeveloped countries must take necessary steps to improve their condition of female education; as women can play a vital role in the nation’s development. If we consider society as tree, then men are like its strong main stem which supports the tree to face the elements and women are like its roots; most important of them all. The stronger the roots are the bigger and stronger the tree will be spreading its branches; sheltering and protecting the needy. Women are the soul of a society; a society can well be judged by the way its women are treated. An educated man goes out to make the society better, while an educated woman; whether she goes out or stays at home, makes the house and its occupants better. Women play many roles in a society- mother, wife, sister, care taker, nurse etc. They are more compassionate towards the needs of others and have a better understanding of social structure. An educated mother will make sure that her children...

Read More




Browse Valentines Week

Featuring 9/9 of Valentines Week

Find all


Contact us

 

Please Help us to improve, Contact us.